Beacon Roofing Supply to Acquire Allied Building Products

Beacon Roofing Supply to Acquire Allied Building Products

Beacon Roofing Supply Inc. announced that the company has entered into an agreement to acquire Allied Building Products Corp. Beacon will purchase Allied from global diversified building products group CRH for $2.625 billion in cash.

Headquartered in Herndon, Va., Beacon is a distributor of residential and non-residential roofing and complementary building products, and the company currently has more than 380 locations in 48 states and six Canadian provinces.

Allied is headquartered in East Rutherford, N.J., and distributes products across 208 locations in 31 states. The company distributes exterior products, such as roofing, siding, windows and doors, and interior products, such as wallboard and suspended ceiling systems.

According to Beacon, the combination of Beacon and Allied will make Beacon one of the largest publicly traded wholesale building materials distributors in North America with pro forma revenues of approximately $7 billion and 593 branches in all 50 states and six provinces across Canada.

Beacon will also become the fourth largest wallboard and acoustical ceiling tile wholesale distributor in the United States, with more than $1 billion of revenue in the interior market category. Beacon and Allied have more than 150 years of combined experience providing service excellence to customers in the building products industry.

The expanded geographic footprint will allow Beacon to enter new local markets, particularly in New York, New Jersey and the upper Midwest. In addition, acquiring Allied allows Beacon to further strengthen the company’s position as a leader in roofing products distribution, while accelerating growth in other key product categories, including siding, windows, doors, decking, trim, waterproofing, insulation and solar.

Beacon expects to finance the acquisition with approximately $2.2 billion of debt financing, a new unsecured note and approximately $500 million of committed convertible preferred equity financing from an entity affiliated with the investment firm Clayton, Dubilier & Rice (CD&R), which in October 2015 sold Roofing Supply Group (RSG) to Beacon. The parties currently expect to consummate the transaction on or around January 2, 2018, subject to satisfaction of customary closing conditions.

Robert R. Buck, chairman of Beacon’s board of directors, stated: “Allied is among the most established and respected companies in our industry, and we are proud that, through this acquisition, Beacon will become one of North America’s largest publicly traded building materials distributors and will operate locations in all 50 states. I want to thank CRH for entrusting Beacon with the future success of Allied and its dedicated employees, who have been part of the CRH family for more than 20 years. The Allied acquisition also presents a great opportunity for CD&R to again become a major shareholder in Beacon. Today is of great significance in Beacon’s history and for the future of building products distribution.”

Paul Isabella, Beacon’s president and chief executive ffficer, commented: “I would like to welcome the more than 3,500 employees from Allied to the Beacon family. We are thrilled to partner with such a loyal and dedicated workforce that shares our commitment to superior customer service and high levels of performance. We are also excited to become a significant player in the robust, growing and still-consolidating interior products market. Together, we will leverage the strengths of both companies, while remaining committed to preserving the deep customer relationships that we have each cultivated over 150 years of combined experience. This is a milestone moment in the long and successful histories of both companies.”

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Published at Thu, 24 Aug 2017 20:15:20 +0000

Tennessee Association of Roofing Contractors Association Raises $14,000 to Aid Families Affected by 2016 Wildfires

Tennessee Association of Roofing Contractors Association Raises $14,000 to Aid Families Affected by 2016 Wildfires

CHL_4265 copyOn April 21, members of the Tennessee Association of Roofing Contractors (TARC) hosted a golf tournament in Gatlinburg, Tenn. to raise funds for Gatlinburg’s Mountain Tough Recovery Team (MTRT), a foundation set up through the East Tennessee Foundation to help families who lost homes in the wildfires that spread through the state in late 2016.

MTRT was created to aid and support families who were adversely affected by the fires on November 28, 2016, that burned 1,800 homes and caused $500 million in damage to the tourism industry.

“It’s important for TARC to support the businesses in Tennessee, especially in times of need,” says TARC past-president Robert Smith, Jr. “There are still families displaced by these fires and businesses yet to be rebuilt.”
In lieu of TARC’s Scholarship Fund, TARC held a special silent auction and reception after the golf tournament to raise funds for fire victims. Items auctioned included Gatlinburg weekend getaway packages donated by the Gatlinburg Visitors Bureau.

TARC exceeded its goal of raising $10,000 for the foundation, raising $14,000.

“The MTRT will utilize these funds to assist the fire survivors with various unmet needs from medical assistance, the replacement of items such as small appliances to be used for food preparation, and assistance with utility costs in temporary housing,” said MTRT board chair Ellen Wilhort.

“It was a touching experience,” Smith says. “To be able to be part of the rebuilding process in these people’s lives made the event worthwhile. We as an organization should be honored to have been able to lend a hand to those in need.”

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Published at Thu, 24 Aug 2017 20:28:46 +0000

Project Profile: Central Park High Rise, New York City Get New Modified Bitumen Roof System

Project Profile: Central Park High Rise, New York City Get New Modified Bitumen Roof System

The NYC 18-story co-op received a new Polyglass self-adhered, modified bitumen roof system as part of its renovation.

Located near Central Park in New York City, this 18-story co-op was renovated to include a new energy efficient 30-year roof system.  General contractor Wayne Bellet Construction selected Polyglass’ self-adhered, modified bitumen roof system for the re-roof project.  To ensure perfect installation, the crew closely monitored winter weather conditions and followed the product storage instructions. The multi-level 18,000 square-foot roof system was completed on schedule.

Project Requirements
The building owner required a Cool Roof Solution to maximize the energy efficiency of the building.  The capabilities of Polyglass’ roofing membranes with patented CURE® Technology and ADESO® Technology met the project requirements.  Membranes manufactured with CURE Technology have improved reflectivity, granule adhesion, UV and stain resistance and durability. In addition, membranes with ADESO Technology have an aggressive adhesive applied to the bottom side of the membranes enabling a fast and torch-less installation.

Roof System Components
Three-ply, self-adhered roof system with 30-year roof system warrantee featuring Polyfresko G SA and Elastoflex SA V. Polyfresko G SA is a highly reflective APP, self-adhered cap sheet with patented CURE and ADESO Technology. Polyfresko G SA is California Title 24 Compliant, listed with the Cool Roof Ratings Council and performs to ENERGY STAR® standards.  Polyfresko G SA was also used for the flashings, creating a seamless, watertight finish. Elastoflex SA V–a low temperature flexibility membrane designed for torch-less applications–was used for the base ply, interply and base flashings.

For more information on Polyglass roofing systems, visit www.polyglass.com

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Published at Thu, 24 Aug 2017 21:27:03 +0000

A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply Encourages Involvement and Support of Industry Associations

A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply Encourages Involvement and Support of Industry Associations

Industry associations promote the advancement of the roofing industry as a whole and offer valuable support for contractors.

Last month, A.C.T Metal Deck Supply enjoyed participating in the Chicago Roofing Contractors Association’s (CRCA) Annual Industry Golf Day. The company had a foursome of golfers participate and sponsored the beverage cart where they passed out peanut packs and free drinks to golfers.

A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply is proud to support the roofing industry’s various associations and encourages contractors to take advantage of the resources that membership provides. Members benefits from continuing education, from peer interaction and networking, from technical support and annual conferences to learn about new products and technologies in the industry.

Many associations offer special discounts for members on vehicle or equipment purchases, can provide access to better insurance rates or financing options for large purchases. Being a member doesn’t mean that you have to attend the meetings, though that is how you can take advantage of sharing best practices and learning from your peers. Many of the meetings feature experts that speak on topics that can help you better run your businesses.

Our industry associations also support the advancement of the roofing industry as a whole through lobbying and watching proposed legislation and regulation changes. In addition to the CRCA, A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply is proud to be an active member of the National Roofing Contractors Association, Carolina’s Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association, North East Roofing Contractors Association, Midwest Roofing Contractors Association, and Roofing Contractors Association of Texas. You can find links to all the associations right here on RoofersCoffeeShop.com on this page.

Learn more about A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply at www.metaldecksupply.com.

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Published at Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:29:01 +0000

Donating to the MRCA Foundation Auction is Now Easier than Ever

Donating to the MRCA Foundation Auction is Now Easier than Ever

Use the convenient online form to donate an item for the MRCA Foundation auction.

This year the MRCA Foundation Auction Fundraiser will be held October 17, 2017 at 5:30 pm in the beautiful Crystal Ballroom of the Marriott St. Louis Grand.

Remember – not only will hundreds of MRCA members see your strong support of the Foundation, but the money raised from donated items will go toward these important initiatives:

  • Roofing Industry Research
  • Industry-related Academic Scholarships for MRCA Members and their families
  • Educational Programming directed towards MRCA Members

The MRCA online auction site will feature all of the items that are donated. Online bidding will be available before and during the actual event!  Even those who can’t be there in person can still bid!

Click here to access MRCA’ auction donation form.

For questions please contact Megan Miller at: mmiller@mrca.org or call 800-497-6722.

The Foundation Board graciously thanks all of the donors for their support and generosity.

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Published at Wed, 16 Aug 2017 01:30:49 +0000

National Nail Introduces the STINGER® CH38-2 Cap Hammer with New Features That Enhance Fastening of House Wraps and Roofing Underlayments

National Nail Introduces the STINGER® CH38-2 Cap Hammer with New Features That Enhance Fastening of House Wraps and Roofing Underlayments

The newly upgraded CH38-2 Cap Hammer has been fine tuned for durability and performance.

National Nail’s STINGER® brand, which celebrates its 10th anniversary in 2017 as a leading brand of fastening tools for roofing underlayment and house wraps, introduces the newly upgraded CH38-2 Cap Hammer, fine-tuned for durability and performance.  The CH38-2 is an economical, non-pneumatic cap fastener that eliminates the hassle of hoses and compressors—which also improves safety.  Best practice applications for the CH38-2 which features the holding power of a 1-inch cap, includes house wrap, rolled insulation, and roofing felt.

The CH38-2 has been enhanced with increased internal handle strength, an improved staple design, track and spring, stronger welds and an added handle grip–all for maximum reliability and performance.

“The redesigned STINGER CH38-2 Cap Hammer is the perfect everyday solution for busy contractors that delivers the holding power of a cap and staple with the speed and ease of a hammer tacker,” said Roger Szotko, STINGER® Product Manager, National Nail.  “It gets the job done for a fraction of the cost of a pneumatic gun without the additional hassle and expense of a hose, compressor and power requirements.”

The CH38-2 Cap Hammer has a fastener capacity of 168 full, 1-inch collated plastic caps and 3/8 -inch crown staples.  To learn more about the newly enhanced, versatile CH38-2 at www.STINGERWORLD.com or call 1-800-746-5659.

About National Nail
National Nail Corp., headquartered in Grand Rapids, Mich., is an employee-owned manufacturer and distributor of high quality, innovative building products and service solutions for the residential and commercial construction industries. Other National Nail brands include Pro-Fit® (packaged, bulk and collated fasteners), and CAMO® (Edge Deck Fastening System; Premium Deck, Premium Trim, Composite, and Structural Screws).

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Published at Mon, 14 Aug 2017 23:58:34 +0000

RoofersCoffeeShop.com Welcomes Karen Edwards

RoofersCoffeeShop.com Welcomes Karen Edwards

Edwards has extensive experience in marketing and writing for the roofing industry.

RoofersCoffeeShop.com, the place where the industry meets for technology, information and everyday business is pleased to welcome Karen Edwards to its team where she will serve as editor.

As editor, Karen will oversee all content on the site, develop editorial guidelines and work with contributors to ensure that visitors to RoofersCoffeeShop.com continue to receive informative and engaging news and information.

A frequent contributor to many industry publications, Karen has written articles for Roofing Contractor, Florida Roofing, Professional Roofing, Western Roofing and Midwest Roofer Magazines. She co-authored the book Sales and Marketing for Roofing Contractors with Heidi Ellsworth.

Karen has a strong background in the roofing industry having held positions with EagleView Technologies, Carlisle Syntec and HJE Marketing.  She also works with roofing contractors and manufacturers as a marketing consultant through her company Casimir Group LLC.

She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Communications with a focus on public relations from Millersville University.

RoofersCoffeeShop.com is proud to welcome her to the team.

About RoofersCoffeeShop.com
RoofersCoffeeShop.com is committed to being a roofing professional advocate by supplying consistent information, education and communication avenues for all roofing professionals, and especially contractors, while promoting the positive growth, education and success of the roofing industry overall. Visitors to the site continue to find excellent opportunities for sharing information while participating in important ongoing conversations concerning new technologies, safety and the overall roofing trade. From the rooftop to the board room, RoofersCoffeeShop.com is “Where the Industry Meets!” For more information, visit www.rooferscoffeeshop.com.

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Published at Mon, 14 Aug 2017 14:47:21 +0000

How Do You Handle Employee Side Jobs?

How Do You Handle Employee Side Jobs?

This month’s topic has been a subject of discussion for years around the RoofersCoffeeShop.com.  Read this lively discussion on our Forum linked Here from 10 years ago and you will see this challenge is still relevant today.  Many of today’s contractors started out doing work on the side so this a very important topic to address for your business.

Please follow along to see these great ideas and policies presented from our Roofing Influencers.

About RCS Roofing Influencers
RoofersCoffeeShop.com is proud to present an exciting new way to approach today’s challenges in the roofing industry – RCS Roofing Influencers! We have created this group with people from various areas of expertise and asking them all for an opinion, tips or advice.  Our readers can get the insight on the subjects that best fits their business.  Please join our new group on Linkedin or Here on RoofersCoffeeShop.com

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Published at Mon, 14 Aug 2017 11:44:35 +0000

Call for Presentations at the Western Roofing Expo 2018

Call for Presentations at the Western Roofing Expo 2018

Attention all public speakers – submit your proposal to speak at the Western Roofing Expo 2018 before November 15.

With the ever-increasing popularity of the Western Roofing Expo and its educational seminars & demos, WSRCA is making a call to all members: apply to teach a seminar at the upcoming Western Roofing Expo 2018 in Las Vegas! They believe the quality of their membership provides a valuable knowledge base to tap into, driving even more relevance and learning opportunities for attendees.

Use this link to access the “Call for Presentations” e-form.  If you have a product or service appropriate for an audience of roofing contractors (averaging 65 attendees per seminar this last year), then you are encouraged to submit your seminar topic, with all relevant details asked on the application form.  Once received, the WSRCA Convention Committee will evaluate and select the top 16 applicants for presentation at this coming year’s Expo — June 10-12, 2018 — at the Paris Las Vegas.

There are several categories and target audiences from which to choose.  However, if your product or service falls outside these categories, please send your form in for review regardless. It may still end up being included.

With all the promotion, including print, emails, vendor distribution, etc., your company will find the exposure well worth the investment of time and energy.  Also, it will continue to boost the educational value that is growing at the Western Roofing Expo; producing some of the most professional, informed roofing contractors in the country.  Educated contractors are good for everyone.

WSRCA looks forward to receiving your application no later than 11/15/2017. Please fill out all information on the form.  Incomplete forms will not be considered. Click here to download the form, when finished, click SUBMIT FORM at the top of the document to return the completed form. If you’re having trouble submitting the form, you can also email it to Joel Viera – WSRCA Director of Exposition & Events, at joel@wsrca.com.

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Published at Fri, 11 Aug 2017 22:13:12 +0000

Cool Roofs are a Compelling Choice in the North

Cool Roofs are a Compelling Choice in the North

Dark Roof’s Summer Cooling Penalty is a Deciding Factor

Cool roofs reflect the sun’s energy and reduce air conditioning loads in the summer, so do dark roofs absorb energy in the winter and reduce heating costs? In northern regions where heating costs are significant, can dark roofs be energy efficient? Some building professionals specify dark absorptive membranes for northern cities like Chicago and Minneapolis believing that they are lowering their clients heating costs and lowering year round energy costs.

An analogy, only slightly tongue in cheek, would be to ask if Chicagoans walking along Michigan Avenue in the winter wear dark clothes to stay warmer? Or do dark colored cars outsell light colors in the Windy City?

So, do dark roofs help improve building energy efficiency in northern cities? Let’s take a look at the arguments.

Heating Degree Days versus Cooling Degree Days

There is no doubt that heating degree days in northern areas are far greater than cooling degree days. For example:

Cooling Days

This means that the number of days the temperature was below 65°F multiplied by how many degrees the temperature was lower, was 9,317. This far outnumbers the cooling degree days and some have argued that therefore dark roofs are appropriate for northern cities such as Minneapolis. However, it’s important to examine the cost of cooling versus the cost of heating.

Energy Costs

Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration for commercial customers in Minnesota in 2015 allows us to compare the cost of heating versus cooling. Assuming gas as the energy source for heating:

BTUs

Added to this, cooling is less efficient than heating. This means that one can’t simply compare the number of heating versus cooling degree days to make a judgment.

Verdict

Degree day comparisons don’t enable a choice of roof reflectivity to be made. Put simply, neither EPDM nor TPO / PVC can be specified on the basis of the number of heating degree days versus those of cooling degree days.

Cooling versus Heating Costs

Heating – Gas Costs

Natural gas is becoming ever more plentiful in the US and costs are fairly stable meaning that heating costs can generally be budgeted for with confidence. Added to that, utilities usually charge commercial customers a flat amount per cubic foot used. Frequently, volume discounts apply and larger customers pay less per BTU of heat than smaller ones.

Cooling – Electricity Costs

Today’s electric bills, especially for commercial and industrial customers, are fairly complex. However, the basic components are as follows:

  • Base Use Rate – the charge per kilowatt hour (kWhr) of energy use.
    • This is common for residential but rare for commercial customers.
    • Can vary depending on the time of year, eg. summer versus winter.
  • Time of Use Rate – the charge per kWhr of energy use that varies depending on the time of day or year.
    • This is increasingly applied to commercial customers.
    • The rate is highest during times of peak demand, such as between 1 and 6 pm. It is lowest during periods of low demand such as 3 to 6 am.
    • If the rate varies by time of year, then summer rates might be highest, when air conditioning use is at its highest.
  • Demand Charge – the cost per kilowatt (kW) of power demand.
    • The charge applies to the highest demand that a customer had for power at any time during a month.
    • To help understand the concept, think of how fast an electric meter is spinning when a lot of equipment is turned on and the air conditioning is running at maximum load. This might be the situation for a short period of time, so energy use could be low, but the power demand could be very high for that short period.
    • It is typically based on the highest power draw seen in 15 minute increments during a month.

All of these components make building electric charges difficult to predict and budget for. Plus, unlike for gas, higher usage levels can dramatically increase the cost of that energy.

Most building professionals clearly understand the impact of the base electric rate or tariff and time of use rates. It is easy to appreciate that lowering air conditioning demand will reduce electric bills. However, those tariffs frequently represent 50% or less of a total electric bill with the demand charge being 50% or larger. By understanding the impact of air conditioning on demand charges, it can be seen that cool roofs have a large role to play impacting building energy efficiency.

Demand Charges

A simple way to think of demand charges versus energy use is to look at an electric meter:

How to read your meter

In a traditional residential meter shown on the left, the upper dials keep track of the cumulative energy use. The lower wheel shows the demand by how fast it is spinning. A more modern or small commercial meter shown on the right displays the same data in a digital fashion.

As an air conditioner does its work during a month, the energy use is added up, leading to an eventual charge based on kilowatt hours. But, on the hottest day of that month, during an afternoon period when the sun was at its highest and creating a higher thermal load through the roof and walls the air conditioner will be operating at a high load. Therefore its “demand” for power will spike and that spike will result in a charge per kW. Even if that spike is for just 15 minutes, that demand charge could be >50% of the monthly bill. Let’s look at a small office building to better understand this:

The customer has a 2 ton air conditioner that draws 7.2kW at maximum load. Each month it runs at an average 50% load for 10 hours a day with an electric charge of $0.090/kWh. That results in a monthly charge of 10 hours x 30 days x 7.2kW x 50% x $0.090/kWhr = $97.20

But, on a sunny day during that same month, the air conditioner might run at maximum load for 15 minutes, triggering a demand charge of $15.00 / kW. The resulting demand charge would be 7.2 kW x $15.00 / kW = $108.00

In this example the demand charge is larger than the use charge. Since dark roofs increase the need for air conditioning, they not only drive up monthly electricity consumption costs, they can significantly increase demand charges, as well.  A cool roof, on the other hand, reflects heat away and helps reduce both monthly consumption and demand charges.

Verdict

Not only is electricity more expensive than gas, but the rate structures are complex. Seemingly small increases in electricity use can result in large additional costs due to the compounding effects of time of use rates and demand charges.

Cool roofs lower a building’s energy use, thereby lowering operating costs. However, overall electric use is often only 50% of the electric charge and the maximum power draw and its demand charge can represent the other half. Cool roofs lower the internal temperature rise on hot sunny days and therefore lower the load on air conditioning equipment.

Location Doesn’t Matter!

As the following data indicates, it doesn’t matter where a building is located; if it uses air conditioning then converting to a cool roof will result in savings.

Let’s compare buildings in the northern, southern, eastern, and western U.S. The basic assumptions are:

Size: 100,000 sq.ft.
Electric use cost: $0.090 / kWhr.
Electric demand cost: $15.00 / kW
Gas cost: $0.80 / therm

To make the calculations conservative, we assumed a high insulation level of R-30, a heater efficiency of 80%, and an air conditioner coefficient of performance of 3.2. Using the Cool Roof Calculator tool, we estimated the impact of converting from a dark roof to a reflective membrane in the following locations:

Region City Savings
Southern USA Houston, TX $5,200 / yr
Northern USA Minneapolis, MN $2,600 / yr
Western USA San Francisco, CA $2,400 / yr
Eastern USA Raleigh, NC $4,100 / yr

Verdict

In warm and hot regions, cool roofs provide for larger energy savings, however, even in more moderate and even northern climates cool roofs improve a building’s energy efficiency. Modeling shows this to hold true so long as a building uses gas to heat and has air conditioning.

Will a Cool Roof Always Result in Actual Cost Savings?

There are a few reasons why some may not receive lower electric bills after converting to cool roofs. For example, overall electric costs may rise year over year or the utility rate structure could change. Also, changes in the building’s use, equipment, or operating patterns could increase overall lower consumption. Suffice to say, modeling shows that cool roofs reduce the impact of solar energy on a building and several case studies have demonstrated reduced utility bills. But, each building is unique and should be evaluated on its own terms.

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Published at Tue, 08 Aug 2017 20:41:01 +0000